Brittney Borowicz

Brittney Borowicz is an integrated marketing professional with a strong communications background specializing in journalism, public relations and social media. Originally from the northwest suburbs of Chicago, Brittney has spent the past few years working with entrepreneurs and small start-ups in the Chicagoland area to enhance their marketing and social media efforts.

Prior to her current role as the marketing manager for a computer networking company, Brittney realized her affinity for all things media and marketing while working in radio and television and as a professional presenter. Later, she began working at a couple of small marketing agencies in Chicago as a Public Relations and Sales Director and Account Manager, which required her to be well-versed in coordinating specialized public and media relations strategies, creative marketing initiatives and cohesive sales process implementations.

As a strong believer in intimate consumer/brand involvement, Brittney helps her clients create content that engages and educates brand audiences while establishing each individual or company as a thought leader in their industry.

How to Boost Your Business with Good (and Bad!) Online Reviews (Featured on SheOwnsIt.com)

Why do content and reviews matter? To make it simple: People want to do business with people and companies that they like and trust.

With the internet taking out the person-to-person aspect of a sale, you must find other ways to build that trust and likability factor.

Reliably publishing valuable and fun content helps build credibility and thought-leadership for your company among your potential and current customers. However, when a potential buyer is not going to read your content — either out of laziness or because they are unaware of it — the least they are going to do is read your reviews. Not every business highlights their reviews and testimonials though, which is not ideal for a buyer looking to potentially do business with your company.

Read more at She Owns It or download the PDF now.

19 Outstanding Points from Seth Godin on Art and Revolution in Marketing

Picture from Nathan Maxwell 

Picture from Nathan Maxwell 

I had the incredible experience of hearing Seth Godin, blogger and author of 18 books, speak at the 2015 Bronto Summit today. In his session, Seth focused on how the connection economy is replacing our scarcity-based industrial one, and what teams can do to create work that matters.

Here are some of my favorite quotes and points Seth Godin made during his presentation:

  1. We [marketers] are running out of clever ways to get peoples’ attention.

  2. We [marketers... and our bosses] always want MORE – clicks, engagement, etc.

  3. If you're in the business of building a network, you will always do better than if you're building a product.

  4. If you are a mass marketer, you better do something that the masses will like.

  5. From a consumers perspective: If you are trying to solve a problem that I don’t have, I’m not going to listen to you [the marketer].

  6. Revolutions destroy the perfect and create the impossible. We must acknowledge the world is changing and leaving it like never before.

  7. Why aren’t you taking the time to make your prospects friends and let them get to know you first?

  8. Humans are really good at connecting. We like connecting. Connection is where value is created.

  9. Doing things wrong on the Internet is not fatal. Test. See what works.

  10. You've heard don't fly too close to the sun. The only way to be remarkable is to fly ever higher.

  11. Being exceptional is a risk. But it's the only choice if you want to be truly successful.

  12. You can't be in a race to the top or the bottom. The only way to survive is to be the irreplaceable

  13. We hold back because we know our parents, teachers & bosses are always going to ask for more. In art, we aim as high as we can.

  14. What is our best work for? Change.

  15. We must throw ourselves off cliffs and grow wings on the way down. This is art.

  16. Innovation is failing until we find something that works.

  17. It is always too soon but there is a huge distinction between being ready and being prepared.

  18. There are many ways to describe success after it has happened. It is scary to try to describe success before it happens.

  19. The enemy of fear is creativity. When we become creative, is when we can create art.

3 Reasons Why You Are Never Too Big to Say “No" (Featured on SheOwnsIt.com)

Working in marketing and public relations has introduced me to many people. These people have operated different businesses, worked in different industries and had different personalities.

Despite all their initial differences, these people all had one thing in common: As soon as they hired me they asked, “so, how are you going to get me on *insert major news network/website here*?”

Valid question.

I am a huge proponent of establishing each of my clients as a thought-leader in their industry. To do this, I start by helping each client create cohesive and educational content that engages their audiences. Upon explaining this to clients, I find that many of them have something else in common: they want to be viewed as a thought-leader and featured in these major media sources but don’t want to do the work to get there.

Many times their reasoning lies in not having the time or bandwidth to create content. Other times, their reasoning lies in the mentality that they are too good, or even the best, and they shouldn’t have to start small just to get big.

While some people are lucky and thrust immediately into the spotlight, it very rarely happens that way. So for those of you who have not quite had your 15-minutes of fame yet, and even for those of you who have, here are 3 reasons you are never too big to say “no” to those smaller media opportunities:

Read more at She Owns It or download the PDF now.

One is Greater than Zero - Why You're Never Too Big to Say "No"

Working in marketing and public relations has introduced me to a lot of very different people. These clients operated different businesses, worked in different industries and had different personalities.

But upon initially being hired, all of these people had one common question: "so, how are you going to get me on *insert major news network/website here*?"

Gary Vaynerchuk recently released a video (below) addressing this very same question and then the issue that I often ran into as well: People want to be featured in these major media sources but aren’t willing to do the work to get there.

In his video, Gary makes some great points, but here are my three favorite:

  1. “Started from the Bottom Now I’m Here” - That’s actually a quote from Drake, not Gary... BUT Gary makes the point that he wasn’t just thrust onto Conan or the Today Show for no reason. Gary started by writing blog posts that only had 6 readers and by recording interviews that only had 19 viewers. Eventually, Gary gained a following and as his influence grew, so did his audiences.
  2. Depth vs. Width - Gary Vaynerchuk is a strong believer in depth vs. width. This means that he would rather go deeper with his community and the people who support him than speak to thousands of people who may or may not care about what he has to say. As with all marketing, building trust with your followers largely lies in nurturing the relationship you have with them. Often, the best way to nurture those relationships is by strongly focusing on them and their needs rather than on the people who weren’t engaging with you in the first place.
  3. Having Humility - I think this was by far my favorite point made during this video. You are never too big to say no. You may have already done the thousands of videos to less than 100 people but there is always value in doing more. You may have already made a name for yourself, but that doesn’t mean somebody won’t find new information in what you have to say.

So, even when it seems like a ten minute interview won’t be worth it or a guest post to a less-traveled blog won’t make a difference, think again. Take those opportunities to nurture the relationship you have with your supporters and use them to perfect your message to future, larger audiences.

View Gary's video below:

It baffles me to see how many people think they are bigger than they actually are. People will ask me questions like "How do I get into the New York Times?" or "How do I get a meeting with that CEO?" My reply? One is better than zero.

Marketing Challenge: Finding a Balance Between Being Present and Being Useful (Featured on SheOwnsIt.com)

As the popularity of social media continues to grow with both customers and salespeople, companies are realizing the importance of being socially present. This presence allows customers to see your company, know your company and ultimately think of your company when they need your product or service. But marketers aren’t just staying present on social media. A true integrated marketing campaign utilizes social media as well as blogs, email blasts, white papers and so on.

As companies strive for this constant presence to their audience, they seem to be forgetting one thing: being useful.

Read the rest of my featured post at She Owns It or download the PDF now.

What Matters More? Video Production Quality or its Content?

If you aren't creating video content, you are missing out. Seriously.

Online video is quickly becoming an essential way for people to get information. According to Cisco, video will account for nearly 69% of all consumer internet traffic by 2017. Don't believe it? YouTube alone gets over one billion unique visitors per month -- more than any other channel besides Facebook -- and don't forget, there are other video distribution sites on the internet too.

Over half of all marketers are currently using video in their content marketing efforts according to various studies. Are marketers doing it well though? The answer is: not all of them.

Gary Vanyerchuk talks about video budget in his blog post, Video Content: You're Doing It Wrong. He (and I) was terrified to find out that when companies think of online video, they only consider spending five to ten percent of their overall budget on the quality of that video. You know... like the part that people watch. The rest is going to distribution.

I think this accounts for many of the shortcuts I have seen taken by brands creating video content. Either 1. they have great content -- it's valuable and interesting -- but the production of it sucks or 2. their content is terrible -- what was the point of me watching this again? -- but the video has great production qualities. [To clarify, when I talk about production quality, I am talking about the audio mixing, how the video actually looks (e.g. shaky vs. stable, unnaturally orange vs. balanced color, etc.). When I am talking about content, I mean... you know... the stuff that company is actually telling or showing you.]

So what matters more? Great content or great production quality?

To play devil's advocate, let me argue for both sides here...

Great content with crappy audio/visuals-

+ People are watching your videos for the content. They want your information and they want it now. Good content is going to keep people coming back for more.

- If the production quality is bad enough, it might drive your viewer crazy enough to close out of the video before they ever get to the awesome content. If this happens, they won't come back.

Crappy content with awesome audio/videos-

+ Viewers will have something nice to look at with easy-to-understand audio which allows for your information to get to them quicker and easier.

- If your content isn't valuable to them, what is the point of your viewer watching your videos in the first place? They probably aren't coming back to waste their time again.

It's pretty clear that as simple as the arguments were above, both play a very critical role in your video content.

Creating great videos doesn't have to be expensive. As Gary Vanyerchuk says in his post, you can pay to distribute your video to millions of people, but a sucky video is still a sucky video. Rather than taking shortcuts to get your video out first or at the cheapest cost, take the time to make sure your message is valuable to your audience and your production quality is something that a viewer isn't going to hit the [x] on.

My 5 Marketing Predictions (Plus 1 Wish) for 2015

As with every other industry on the planet, marketing is constantly growing and changing. From newspaper advertising to radio and television to digital media, the marketing industry strives to innovate and at times, just stay up-to-date with the most recent trend that is driving results.

2014 was the year of content creation. Content became the glue that held many marketing campaigns together. Intriguing content got people interested and kept them coming back. One thing that appears to be obvious is that the importance of content creation is not going anywhere in 2015. Here are five of my other marketing predictions for 2015.

  1. Content creation will become a company-wide effort. Right now, content creation is largely a task for the marketing team within a company. Why? Marketers know how to write, create visual media out of that writing and (supposedly) know what the consumers of their brand want. In 2015, companies will understand the importance of input for from all teams. Employees will be tapped for their expertise on different subjects that consumers really care about. For example, technical support staff can create content about the questions they are asked all the time about the products the company sells. This quickly and easily creates valuable content for many consumers
  2. There will be a greater value in community. Social media has been around for years now and while many companies and brands are using it to promote their products and services, they are ignoring one of their greatest assets… their fans. In 2015, companies are going to start to focus their marketing on their community. Not only will marketing become more engaging in order to interact with and build trust with that community, but companies will work harder to create brand advocates out of that community. In addition, sometimes the best content creation comes from those community members. Testimonials and stories from consumers can be repurposed into relatable and effective marketing opportunities.
  3. Content creation will move beyond the blog post. While some companies are still working on getting a blog onto their website and other companies are just trying to blog consistently, the movers and shakers of marketing will be moving beyond the stale blog post all together. Marketers will begin producing richer content and making content an experience for their consumers. An example of this will be marketers creating stories through videos, infographics, webinars, or even, yes, a blog post packed with visuals. These stories will be filled with valuable information that is designed to relate to the consumer without the hard sell of products and services.
  4. If it’s not on mobile, it’s not working. Over 60% of emails are opened on mobile devices first but conversion rates on mobile are unimpressive. This means that there is still a huge potential for marketers to better understand how mobile users behave and to utilize that information to build bigger and better mobile marketing campaigns. Mobile-first thinking will be a priority as mobile usage and mobile content consumption continues to grow.
  5. The customer is in control. With the influx of information available on the internet, businesses and consumers are spending more time researching the products and services of different companies before they buy. The buyer wants to know they are getting the best prices, the best products and the best services they can and with the internet, they have a choice of many different companies. Because of this abundance of information, the buyer is in truly in control of the buying process. Because of this, brands need to build their marketing campaigns around grabbing a consumer’s attention, gaining that consumer’s trust and then making sure that consumer comes back for that product or service time-and-time again.

In addition to my marketing predictions, I have one marketing wish for 2015:

My wish is for brands to find a balance between being present and being useful.

Brands constantly strive to be seen by their consumers. They want their consumers to see them, know them and then think of them when they need their product or service. Many brands actively stay present in their consumers’ lives through blog posts, email blasts and/or social media. The brands that are effectively marketing to their consumers though, are those who are providing useful information to their consumers such as video tutorials and how-to articles. 

Within the past year though, I have become annoyed. Many brands have become so concerned about being seen by their potential consumers, that they are no longer useful… just annoying. Everyone agrees that spammy, frequent emails are the worst, but some runner-ups include a boring blog post for the sake of having multiple blog posts per day and brand news that really isn’t news. 

Brands must start asking themselves, “will our customers and potential customers find our content to be useful?”

By all means, stay present! But find a balance between that presence and usefulness. Answer questions from your followers on social media and create new how-to videos for your products and services. I just ask that brands find that happy place between making sure their consumers and potential customers know them and the three-times-a-day-shoving-useless-content-down-your-throat emails.

The Number One Mistake Everybody Makes on Twitter

Thank you to Gary Vaynerchuk for this wonderful SlideShare presentation.

This is one of my absolute biggest pet peeves on Twitter. I have spent a few years trying to teach Twitter users (Tweeters?) this rule but it still astounds me to see people not knowing how to properly use this common Twitter function.

To see what I am talking about, and to get a little laugh, click through Gary's SlideShare below.

The More You Know


Giving Thanks: My First Year as a Marketing Manager

Marketing Manager - Brittney Borowicz

Back in March, I took my first job as a marketing manager... but not just as a marketing manager... a whole marketing team. The company that had hired me had never had a marketing person before and while some of the marketing they were doing was great, other areas were inconsistent or without much direction.

Although the thought of this stressed me out greatly, the company seemed amazing and I knew it would be a huge opportunity for my career.

With the Thanksgiving holiday coming up, I wanted to share some of the things I have been most thankful for during my first year as a marketing manager/marketing-team-of-one.

  1. I am thankful for all of the things I have learned so far and continue to learn. The amount I have learned these past few months is endless… from a new content management system and new email program to new trade show procedures… every moment has been a new learning opportunity. In addition to marketing programs and procedures, I am in constant awe of how much there is to learn about the industries my company is involved with. These industries are growing (and changing) every single day. Learning the industries also involves learning about the businesses and consumers involved in those industries and how best to market to them. 
  2. I am thankful for my team. Although I may be the only “official” marketer in the company, I have constant support from my immediate boss and people on the sales team. They take the time to teach me the ins-and-outs of products and services that I can’t get my non-technical brain around and they are always willing to learn from me too. They show me what marketing they have done in the past and are open to new ideas and suggestions. The thing I am most thankful for about my team is that they have confidence in me to “do my thing.” They allow me to make decisions and support me in my efforts even when they don’t always completely agree. (Right now we are testing website pop-ups. Initially there was some pushback on it, but we’ve all agreed it’s something to try.)
  3. I am thankful for my failures. Although I don’t think I’ve had an “epic” failures yet as a marketing manager, I constantly feel like I am failing. Coming into this job, I knew I wouldn’t know everything right away. I knew there would be a learning curve especially since there were no official marketing plans or procedures when I took the job. Nonetheless, there are times I feel like I am not doing enough. There are other times where I feel like what I am doing is not good enough. As stressful as this is sometimes, it is more motivation for me to do more and to do better. It reminds me that I can’t and won’t be perfect but each failure, or feeling of failure, it will teach me how to do better for both my company as well as for myself.

What are you most thankful for in your company this year? Is it the things you learned, your team, or your failures? Or maybe you had a major breakthrough or made a decision that made a huge impact? I want to hear about it!

Happy Thanksgiving! Have a safe and happy holiday!

Giving Thanks - Brittney Borowicz

Why You Need to Stop Making Excuses and Just Do It

I have recently decided to make a lifestyle change and start running. My youngest brother always laughs at me for this and asks, "What do you mean that you don't know how to run?"

For those runners out there like my brother who find running easy and even *gasp* enjoyable, trying to learn how to run anywhere beyond a mile might seem like a trivial goal. I -- the girl who could barely run a mile in gym class -- on the other hand, am finding it to be one of the most challenging things I have ever done.

I'll admit that as much as I want to be good at running, I don't want to have to work at it. I just wanted to be good from the start and made the goal of completing five miles on my first run.

What an idiot.

I did not complete that five miles and instead complained to my best friend about how running just totally sucks. To my surprise, instead of caving to my complaints and agreeing with me, they challenged me, saying that I would never get better without working at it.

The next day, my friend and I both downloaded the Nike+ Running App which allowed us to track our running progress and even compete against each other on a leaderboard of distance and number of runs recorded throughout the month.

While it quickly became obvious that while my friend wasn't running marathons, they weren't a running newbie either.

Remember how I said I just wanted to be good at all of this from the start? Well, after seeing how much much better and more motivated my friend was than me at these challenges, it got discouraging and I started to think of every excuse in the book.

"I didn't run today because..."

  • "... I was tired."
  • "... my legs hurt."
  • "... I didn't have time."
  • "... I forgot my shoes at home."
  • "... it started raining."

"My distance and/or time wasn't good today because..."

  • "... I was tired."
  • "... my legs hurt."
  • "... I forgot my music."
  • "... I forgot to start my Nike+ app at the beginning of my run." (Lie.)
  • "... there was a guy creeping me out on the treadmill next to me."

And that's when I realized I had run out of excuses.

So what's the point of this story?

Why You Need to Stop Making Excuses and "Just Do It" - Brittney Borowicz

I spent more time and energy on thinking up excuses as to why I wasn't running or wasn't pushing myself to do better than I actually did running. If I had spent all that wasted time actually running, I could have probably been an Olympic long distance runner by now. (No, not really, but hopefully you get the point.)

After finally putting my head down and working at it, I am proud to say that I now can run two whole miles without feeling like crying afterwards. Maybe not impressive by a marathoner's standards, and I'm still not as good as my friend, but it's a start... and that's all that you really need.

Starting is often the hardest part of getting things done and in many cases, making excuses is a whole lot easier. The thing about excuses though? Excuses don't get things done. Excuses don't yield results. Excuses DEFINITELY don't make a better runner, marketer, parent, whatever.

So instead of making excuses today, "just do it."

What are you making excuses about today and what are you going to start doing instead?

--

(Before people start yelling at me, this is not an advertisement for Nike or their app. Their slogan just... you know... works for my story. Plus it ties in well since I happen to be using their app. For your information though, my running shoes are made by Adidas.)