Brittney Borowicz

Brittney Borowicz is an integrated marketing professional with a strong communications background specializing in journalism, public relations and social media. Originally from the northwest suburbs of Chicago, Brittney has spent the past few years working with entrepreneurs and small start-ups in the Chicagoland area to enhance their marketing and social media efforts.

Prior to her current role as the marketing manager for a computer networking company, Brittney realized her affinity for all things media and marketing while working in radio and television and as a professional presenter. Later, she began working at a couple of small marketing agencies in Chicago as a Public Relations and Sales Director and Account Manager, which required her to be well-versed in coordinating specialized public and media relations strategies, creative marketing initiatives and cohesive sales process implementations.

As a strong believer in intimate consumer/brand involvement, Brittney helps her clients create content that engages and educates brand audiences while establishing each individual or company as a thought leader in their industry.

What Matters More? Video Production Quality or its Content?

If you aren't creating video content, you are missing out. Seriously.

Online video is quickly becoming an essential way for people to get information. According to Cisco, video will account for nearly 69% of all consumer internet traffic by 2017. Don't believe it? YouTube alone gets over one billion unique visitors per month -- more than any other channel besides Facebook -- and don't forget, there are other video distribution sites on the internet too.

Over half of all marketers are currently using video in their content marketing efforts according to various studies. Are marketers doing it well though? The answer is: not all of them.

Gary Vanyerchuk talks about video budget in his blog post, Video Content: You're Doing It Wrong. He (and I) was terrified to find out that when companies think of online video, they only consider spending five to ten percent of their overall budget on the quality of that video. You know... like the part that people watch. The rest is going to distribution.

I think this accounts for many of the shortcuts I have seen taken by brands creating video content. Either 1. they have great content -- it's valuable and interesting -- but the production of it sucks or 2. their content is terrible -- what was the point of me watching this again? -- but the video has great production qualities. [To clarify, when I talk about production quality, I am talking about the audio mixing, how the video actually looks (e.g. shaky vs. stable, unnaturally orange vs. balanced color, etc.). When I am talking about content, I mean... you know... the stuff that company is actually telling or showing you.]

So what matters more? Great content or great production quality?

To play devil's advocate, let me argue for both sides here...

Great content with crappy audio/visuals-

+ People are watching your videos for the content. They want your information and they want it now. Good content is going to keep people coming back for more.

- If the production quality is bad enough, it might drive your viewer crazy enough to close out of the video before they ever get to the awesome content. If this happens, they won't come back.

Crappy content with awesome audio/videos-

+ Viewers will have something nice to look at with easy-to-understand audio which allows for your information to get to them quicker and easier.

- If your content isn't valuable to them, what is the point of your viewer watching your videos in the first place? They probably aren't coming back to waste their time again.

It's pretty clear that as simple as the arguments were above, both play a very critical role in your video content.

Creating great videos doesn't have to be expensive. As Gary Vanyerchuk says in his post, you can pay to distribute your video to millions of people, but a sucky video is still a sucky video. Rather than taking shortcuts to get your video out first or at the cheapest cost, take the time to make sure your message is valuable to your audience and your production quality is something that a viewer isn't going to hit the [x] on.