Brittney Borowicz

Brittney Borowicz is an integrated marketing professional with a strong communications background specializing in journalism, public relations and social media. Originally from the northwest suburbs of Chicago, Brittney has spent the past few years working with entrepreneurs and small start-ups in the Chicagoland area to enhance their marketing and social media efforts.

Prior to her current role as the marketing manager for a computer networking company, Brittney realized her affinity for all things media and marketing while working in radio and television and as a professional presenter. Later, she began working at a couple of small marketing agencies in Chicago as a Public Relations and Sales Director and Account Manager, which required her to be well-versed in coordinating specialized public and media relations strategies, creative marketing initiatives and cohesive sales process implementations.

As a strong believer in intimate consumer/brand involvement, Brittney helps her clients create content that engages and educates brand audiences while establishing each individual or company as a thought leader in their industry.

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"I Quit!" My Story of How Quitting My Job Led Me to My Goal

A few years ago, when I was just getting started in marketing, I took a job that to be perfect. The position was at this great little, start-up marketing agency right outside of Chicago. This agency promised the world to me -- real hands-on experience with some of the best marketing tools, strategies and leadership available. A few days before I started the job, however, the marketing director who had hired me quit. It was at this point that I should have sensed something wrong.

I spent almost a year at this small agency and in some ways, I did learn a lot. However, a lot of what I learned was the type of employee and person I didn't want to be. Only a few weeks in, my job turned into more of a personal assistant role for the owner of the company than a marketing position. My creativity was squashed, I rarely used the skills that I had come to the company with and eventually stopped learning new, important skills that would help my future career. After not feeling fulfilled for a long time in my role, I made the decision to quit.

When I decided to quit, I had another job lined up that I was SURE I was going to get. It was all but promised to me. Unfortunately, about a week after I quit the first job, the company I had planned on going to called me to say they had decided to restructure their marketing and sales teams and would no longer be hiring anybody to fill the position. I was bummed and unemployed.

It took almost two months, but finally a great opportunity presented itself on LinkedIn. I was quickly hired at a small marketing agency in Chicago where I was able to really hone in on what I was hired to do while developing as a well-rounded and skilled marketing professional. This company understood how unfulfilled I was at my previous job and continuously encouraged me to develop new skills that would accelerate my marketing career to new heights. Thanks to their support and guidance, I am now happy to report that for the past few months, I have been working as the full-time marketing manager for a fantastic company outside of the city of Chicago. Not only has this been a huge opportunity for my career and a tremendously better experience than my first job as a marketing professional, but it is proof that sometimes the bumpiest of roads can lead you to the best opportunities.

I learned a couple of lessons from this experience, including:

  1. You must embrace all of the bumps and bruises that come on your journey in life. Although I was unhappy with that first job, I grasped every opportunity I had to learn... even if it wasn't about marketing. The time management and organizational skills I learned during that time as well as a new sense of confidence I gained in speaking to people one-on-one are essential to my career today and have helped me get to where I am.
  2. Quitters sometimes DO win. You may not always like your job and you may HATE your boss but that doesn't mean you should quit every job you ever have. I have learned though that there are certain aspects of the job that you have to weigh when deciding whether or not to quit. Because I am young, one of the most critical aspects of a job I both need and want are opportunities to grow both in my career and as a person. That first company could not do that for me and that's when I had to say "goodbye." I was very grateful to find after I left that there were plenty of other companies willing to give me the fulfillment I needed and deserved.

Lastly, although I would NEVER recommend quitting one job without another lined up, taking some time off is pretty amazing. I went straight from working in college to working in the real world. The almost two months I was unemployed after quitting that disappointing job allowed me to travel, learn how to cook (kind of) and focus on what really made me happy. These are experiences I may not have had if I never said, "I quit."

"I Quit!" My Story of How Quitting My Job Led Me to Here

5 Social Media Platforms to be on that Aren't Facebook or Twitter

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Social media has become a huge player in business promotion and engagement over recent years. With so many different platforms to choose from, many businesses don't know where to start and therefore start EVERYWHERE.

The truth is, not every social media platform is right for your business or consumers. Rather than be on every social site, it is important to choose only a few platforms to focus your efforts on so that you can generate the most consumer engagement, and ultimately, sales for your business.

So which social media platform is right for your business? Here is a quick snapshot of five of the top social media platforms to be on that aren't Facebook or Twitter. (Although I happen to love both Facebook and Twitter.)

LinkedIn

Best business uses: Networking to reach potential clients.

How to maximize your reach:

  • Join LinkedIn groups that relate to your business or industry. Once you've established yourself in a group, work to answer questions and foster conversations, which will boost your reputation as an expert and help others get to know your company.

  • Engage with others in your network. This is obviously the best way to network with people both in and outside of your industry and the best way to find new, potential clients.

How not to use it: 

  • Don't spend too much time pitching your products or services. Instead, promote news and information about the industry your business is in.

YouTube

Best business use: Building credibility by showcasing your knowledge and skills.

How to maximize your reach: 

  • Make a list of the 10 most frequently asked questions about your industry and film yourself answering them. Think of the kind of queries that people sit down to Google.
  • Because YouTube videos show up in Google search results, make sure to optimize the videos with as many keywords as possible.

How not to use it: 

  • Don't post long videos -- keep them under a minute and a half. Focus on one question or issue per video to keep your message on track.

Pinterest

Best business use: Promoting your brand to a female-skewed audience, specifically mothers. (Although, men are increasingly beginning to use Pinterest.)

How to maximize your reach: 

  • Use good SEO practices when titling your boards and filling out Pins and descriptions. It's important to name your boards with phrases people will search for.
  • Check Google Trends. If people are searching for something related to your business or industry, create a board or Pins around the topic.

How not to use it: 

  • Keep personal Pins highlighting your favorite books, fashion, and travel photos separate from those linking to your company's URL. It's okay for both business and personal boards to reside in the same profile. For a “personal” board, consider something that may indirectly involve your business or industry.
  • Never use copyrighted pictures to create Pins.

Instagram

Best business use: Promoting your brand via stylized images to a largely twenty-something audience.

How to maximize your reach: 

  • The revenue generated by an Instagram follower is 10 times greater than that generated by a Twitter follower, according to data analytics firm, SumAll. Take pictures of what makes your business unique or helpful to its consumers. Take pictures of both products and especially of people using your products.
  • Instagram allows you to connect to Facebook or Twitter so that you can cross-post your pictures.
  • Use hashtags to help your customers find your products and services across all three platforms.

How not to use it: 

  • Don't let your account go dormant. Update it with new pictures at least every other week to keep people interested.

Google+

Best business use: Promoting your brand with Google integration – which carries significant weight in terms of SEO and organic search visibility.

How to maximize your reach: 

  • Google+ has a larger variety of communities to choose from (similar to LinkedIn).
  • Google+ Hangouts is a great, free alternative to other webinar services. You can only have 10 participants actively on video but you can stream the video to an unlimited number of viewers using YouTube.

How not to use it: 

  • Posting only about your product. Google+ encourages engagement with your customers. Only about 20% of your posts should be about your product/service while the other 80% about your customers and their lifestyles.
  • Ignoring “Circles.” Google+ Circles allow you to segment and target specific messages and posts to specific people (Ex: Customers vs. prospects vs. industry professionals vs. partners.)

Why is LinkedIn So Important? + A LinkedIn Share Guide

Although it is typically underrated among other social media platforms, LinkedIn is the most popular and largest professional networking site available today. With over 240 million active users and 3 million businesses having a company page, it's the perfect platform for getting hired, connecting with other business professionals and business-to-business (B2B) networking and sales.

So why is LinkedIn so important? There are many reasons, but here are a few that were mentioned above...

  1. Personal branding - LinkedIn is one of the few and free ways to promote yourself as a professional and/or thought-leader in your industry. Not only do you have an online resume on display, but its home feed allows you to share your work, other industry-related news, articles and so on with the rest of your network. In addition, joining groups and commenting on other peoples' posts allows you to share your knowledge with people outside of your network. This personal branding can help land you a job or even advance the career you already have.
  2. Connecting with other professionals - LinkedIn is a great place to make strong connections with other people in your industry or professionals with similar interests. As mentioned above, LinkedIn allows professionals to share their knowledge with each other. In addition, don't be afraid to seek advice from other professionals or even connect to do business with that individual in the future.
  3. B2B networking and sales - With over three million businesses on LinkedIn, it's the perfect place to find sales leads for B2B companies. LinkedIn has a powerful search function that allows a person to search within specific industries or even for people with a certain job title to do business with. Company pages are also a great way to keep track of competitors, partners and other interesting companies.

Now that you know a few reasons why this business networking platform is so important... Are you on LinkedIn but don't know where to start? Or maybe you have a profile but need some easy ways to help make your presence known.

I have included, what I like to call, a "LinkedIn Share Guide" below. I like to share this guide with people who are new to LinkedIn or want to make more of an impact on their network without doing too much work.

Download the LinkedIn Share Guide PDF here.

LinkedIn Share Guide

General Maintenance:

  • Have an updated, professional photo
  • Keep your profile updated with job descriptions, job titles, projects, etc.
  • Make sure your company description, job description and posts are consistent with Grid Connect messaging
  • Customize your profile URL

Activity:

Every day (when applicable)

  • Like, comment on, and/or share new posts from your company page
  • Like, comment on, and/or share new posts from your colleagues that are relevant to your company or industry
  • Respond to comments on your posts
  • Accept pending connections (if connections are appropriate for your business or networking purposes)
  • Check who has viewed your profile

Every week

  • Share an interesting link to an article or video related to your industry
  • Search for 5-10 people you can connect with and send them an invitation (if connections are appropriate for your business or networking purposes)
  • Send thank you messages to those who have connected with you throughout the week
  • Post to a group that is relevant to your industry

Every month

  • Share one piece of original content (e.g. blog post, case study, answering a question you frequently get, etc.)
  • Catch up with one of your connections that may foster new business opportunities
  • Follow a new thought-leader in your industry
  • Post about any events you will be attending during the month (especially if you are speaking at them or sponsoring them)
  • Leave groups that are not active and look for new ones that may be beneficial to you and your company or brand

Download the LinkedIn Share Guide PDF here.

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